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Places

Unexplored Areas

Rainforest

Rainforest
Photo Source: MorgueFile

Somebody recently asked the question, “are there any lands on the earth that are yet to be explored?” The answer to that question turned out to be no, but there are areas in these places that have not been explored. To be more precise let's take a place like Brazil in South America. We all know that Brazil has been explored, even though it has been explored there are still parts of that land that no man has ventured into. Maybe I should say no modern man, because we really don't know who might be living in some parts of Brazil, such as the rainforest. While we know about part of the rainforest, we certainly don't know about all of it. There could very easily be tribes living there that have never seen a modern man. I might go even as far as to say maybe they are better off for it. recently, a tribe like this was discovered in the rainforest. I can't be sure, but I think it may have been found during logging operations. The rainforest is shrinking at an alarming rate. There might even be animals living in there that we either know nothing about, or have survived for millions of years ago. This is not beyond the realm of possibility.

Some say that the most unexplored places in the world are caves. While this may be true, if we add up all the square footage of caves, it may not equal parts of other areas that are unexplored. We know it certainly doesn't add up to the surface of the bottom of the ocean, which is really the most unexplored place on earth. What could we find if we did explore most of all of the available caves? I guess we could find some sort of cave dwelling animal that we might've thought was extinct. Many times I have seen movies where people go into caves, or remote areas, and they find Neanderthals, or dinosaurs. I know I have seen quite a few movies like this myself. The truth is that this turns out to be very far-fetched. To find dinosaurs alive in cave like settings would probably have to mean that they were able to somehow change their eating habits and find a new source of food, which is highly unlikely. They would also have had to go into these caves in at least one pair of male and female animal so that they could reproduce and still be around today. Animals usually don't like to leave their hunting grounds, unless they are driven out and once this happens they usually don't survive to all.

Would it be the same with the oceans of the world, could there be animals that date back to the time of the dinosaurs still living in waters somewhere? Many believe this to be true. They cite things like the loch Ness monster, and the many other famous Lake monsters from all around the world. There have been many sightings by people that swear they have either seen what is known as a sea serpent, or a dinosaur. The problem with these kinds of sightings is that there are so many things in the water that can be mistaken for other things. Even an oddly shaped log floating on the surface might have a profile reminiscent of some sort of creature. Having said this, if there was anywhere on Earth that some sort of prehistoric animal could still be living in, it would probably have to be either a channel leading to a river or in the ocean itself. There have been claims of fish living today, that were thought to have been extinct for millions of years ago, an example of this is the Tile fish, which turned out to be not only NOT extinct, but populous enough to be eaten again. Just as there are reports of strange sightings in lakes and oceans, there are also reports of strange sightings in the northern woods of the United States and in many other countries. We have all heard of such creatures as Bigfoot and the Yeti, but again all evidence points to some type of bear and not a mythical creature or a throwback.

Desert

Desert
Photo Source: MorgueFile

People may wonder what other places that there could be that have not been explored on this planet because they realize that most places have been. My answer to that is you might be surprised. One of the types of places where some exploration has taken place, but nowhere near enough to know everything about it, are the deserts of our planet. Why wouldn't people want to explore these places? Isn't it true that there may be many unknown civilizations buried beneath the sand? From a practical standpoint, the problem with exploring a desert is that it is very dangerous to human life. Temperatures become unbearable, sandstorms can bury you, and truthfully it is very hard to know where to explore since everything looks the same. Recently, the use of satellites has made things a little easier by showing some areas that seem to have ruins buried under them.

Mountain

Mountains
Photo Source: MorgueFile

Is it fair to count unclimbed mountains as areas that have not been explored? I don't know if it is or not, but it is doubtful that some undiscovered type of life would only live on one mountaintop, but be that as it may, there is a place in Bhutan that is called Gangkhar Puensum, and it is the highest mountain never to have been climbed, reaching a height of 7570 meters above sea level. It's not that people haven't tried to get to the top of this mountain, there have been four expeditions, but none were successful. The government of Bhutan has decided to close the mountain for religious reasons, so we may never know what lives on it if anything.

Sometimes areas are so hostile that is almost impractical to think about exploring them. Two of these areas are the ice cap in Greenland and huge parts of Siberia. Northern Siberia is almost completely covered in ice. Central Siberia is mostly mountain ranges. Recently, expeditions have gone into Siberia, but this huge land could take centuries to explore properly. Places with a lot of mountains, such as central Siberia and northern Colombia take a special type of explorer. This explorer must be part mountain climber and part archaeologist. It is very tough going and at times can be very risky, and we have no idea what dangerous animals could be lurking in these places. I personally don't think there's any chance of finding such a thing as the missing link, or a race of cavemen, but I would never write off any area on earth.

The Central Range of New Guinea has been declared a park. Much of this area is still unexplored and there was a very good chance that while you won't find animals previously thought to be extinct living there, we may find tribes of humans that are unfamiliar with modern man. If I were to be asked what percentage of the land on earth is still unexplored, I could only state what I have heard, but its accuracy is questionable, that figure is about 1/8 of the landmass, but more than 95% of the underwater world of this planet still remains unexplored.